lirazel: ([misc] who says)
I just posted all this on tumblr but I'm putting it here too because this functions much more as my journal so I like to keep thoughts like this archived here. It contains a lot of body image talk, so feel free to skip if you're not interested or if that could trigger you in any way. I'm putting it here for me, but you're welcome to talk if you wish. Whatever works for you!

Read more... )
lirazel: ([misc] when the revolution comes)
Gah, y'all, I have been so incredibly spoiled by my flist/dashboard, by my years in Buffy fandom, by the happy little world of feminist-consciousness I've been living in fandom-wise for the past few years. Trying to figure out how to deal with a fandom that isn't even on Feminism 101 levels is hurting my heart and my brain and making me realize how grateful I am for all of you.

Warning: fairly explicit talk about rape/sexual assault below the cut. PLEASE don't click on it if it might hurt you in any way at all.

trigger warning: rape orsexual assault )
lirazel: ([kpop] you don't know me)
For those of you who have any interest at all in talk about beauty standards/fashion/Korean culture/kpop, this video is worth checking out. A British model heads to Seoul to look into fashion week there for Vice and talks to a bunch of random people about fashion in Seoul. Featuring the world's shortest and most bizarre interview with Infinite, the most polite punk you'll ever meet, a rockabilly barber, and couples' matching underwear. Plus some really sad stuff about beauty standards and plastic surgery.

It's a mishmash of interesting things, and what I particularly liked was the people she talks to who aren't in the entertainment industry. Mostly because everything I know about Korean culture has been filtered through kdramas/kpop, so getting to hear from normal people in a nice change.

There's some stuff I learned and some stuff that broke my heart, and did I mention that the Infinite interview is really strange? It was clearly filmed at the time they were filming the bts stuff for the Second Invasion DVD so the styling is very familiar, and it's so strange to try to look at them through the eyes of someone who has no idea who they are.

There's some quite uncomfortably graphic plastic surgery stuff starting at about 25 minutes in, so you might want to avert your eyes if you're sensitive to that sort of thing.

Anyway: check it out.

lirazel: ([kpop] you don't know me)
For those of you who have any interest at all in talk about beauty standards/fashion/Korean culture/kpop, this video is worth checking out. A British model heads to Seoul to look into fashion week there for Vice and talks to a bunch of random people about fashion in Seoul. Featuring the world's shortest and most bizarre interview with Infinite, the most polite punk you'll ever meet, a rockabilly barber, and couples' matching underwear. Plus some really sad stuff about beauty standards and plastic surgery.

It's a mishmash of interesting things, and what I particularly liked was the people she talks to who aren't in the entertainment industry. Mostly because everything I know about Korean culture has been filtered through kdramas/kpop, so getting to hear from normal people in a nice change.

There's some stuff I learned and some stuff that broke my heart, and did I mention that the Infinite interview is really strange? It was clearly filmed at the time they were filming the bts stuff for the Second Invasion DVD so the styling is very familiar, and it's so strange to try to look at them through the eyes of someone who has no idea who they are.

There's some quite uncomfortably graphic plastic surgery stuff starting at about 25 minutes in, so you might want to avert your eyes if you're sensitive to that sort of thing.

Anyway: check it out.

um um um!

Mar. 22nd, 2012 02:32 pm
lirazel: ([misc] byronic hero)
Apparently I had seen this before? I guess I had, because I just found it while I was transferring things over into my delicious account. But I stumbled upon it and enjoyed it as though it was/were (whatever) the first time I was seeing it.




Oh, fandom. How I love you.



[eta] Aaaaand, apparently the new Doctor Who companion the vaguest of spoilers )

um um um!

Mar. 22nd, 2012 02:32 pm
lirazel: ([misc] byronic hero)
Apparently I had seen this before? I guess I had, because I just found it while I was transferring things over into my delicious account. But I stumbled upon it and enjoyed it as though it was/were (whatever) the first time I was seeing it.




Oh, fandom. How I love you.



[eta] Aaaaand, apparently the new Doctor Who companion the vaguest of spoilers )

um um um!

Mar. 22nd, 2012 02:32 pm
lirazel: ([misc] byronic hero)
Apparently I had seen this before? I guess I had, because I just found it while I was transferring things over into my delicious account. But I stumbled upon it and enjoyed it as though it was/were (whatever) the first time I was seeing it.




Oh, fandom. How I love you.



[eta] Aaaaand, apparently the new Doctor Who companion the vaguest of spoilers )

links

Mar. 14th, 2012 09:34 am
lirazel: ([misc] when the revolution comes)
Last night, Robin McKinley (FAAAAAAAAAAVE) linked to this post about twitter stories about sexism which lead to a this website. Y'all should check it out: it's powerful and infuriating.

links

Mar. 14th, 2012 09:34 am
lirazel: ([misc] when the revolution comes)
Last night, Robin McKinley (FAAAAAAAAAAVE) linked to this post about twitter stories about sexism which lead to a this website. Y'all should check it out: it's powerful and infuriating.

links

Mar. 14th, 2012 09:34 am
lirazel: ([misc] when the revolution comes)
Last night, Robin McKinley (FAAAAAAAAAAVE) linked to this post about twitter stories about sexism which lead to a this website. Y'all should check it out: it's powerful and infuriating.
lirazel: ([s] clever)
+ [livejournal.com profile] mollivanders has some thoughts on Molly Hooper which are excellent. Oh, oh, oh Molly.

+ [livejournal.com profile] upupa_epops has brilliant, brilliant thoughts on Katherine and Elena (and by extension Damon and Stefan)

+ [livejournal.com profile] lutamira has stats about the Oscar noms that are simultaneously depressing and not at all surprising. [eta--this is flocked, too! But the article is here and if you want to rant, you can totally do it here in the comments]

And now I'm going to go back to work/taking breaks to read Derek/Casey fic because who am I.
lirazel: ([s] clever)
+ [livejournal.com profile] mollivanders has some thoughts on Molly Hooper which are excellent. Oh, oh, oh Molly.

+ [livejournal.com profile] upupa_epops has brilliant, brilliant thoughts on Katherine and Elena (and by extension Damon and Stefan)

+ [livejournal.com profile] lutamira has stats about the Oscar noms that are simultaneously depressing and not at all surprising. [eta--this is flocked, too! But the article is here and if you want to rant, you can totally do it here in the comments]

And now I'm going to go back to work/taking breaks to read Derek/Casey fic because who am I.
lirazel: ([s] clever)
+ [livejournal.com profile] mollivanders has some thoughts on Molly Hooper which are excellent. Oh, oh, oh Molly.

+ [livejournal.com profile] upupa_epops has brilliant, brilliant thoughts on Katherine and Elena (and by extension Damon and Stefan)

+ [livejournal.com profile] lutamira has stats about the Oscar noms that are simultaneously depressing and not at all surprising. [eta--this is flocked, too! But the article is here and if you want to rant, you can totally do it here in the comments]

And now I'm going to go back to work/taking breaks to read Derek/Casey fic because who am I.
lirazel: ([s] clever)
So Mark, he of the Mark Watches blog, is now watching Buffy straight through and posting his thoughts as he goes. This has stirred up a lot of feelings in the remnants of BtVS fandom, and we’ve already talked at length about the depth of his analysis (or, more accurately, the lack thereof) and whether or not we think it’s weird that he’s making money off of basically just posting his emotional responses to a show (for the record, my thoughts are: yes, it’s weird, but I’d probably do the same thing if I had the option, so I can’t really blame him). But I wanted to talk about something I’ve seen mentioned a couple of times in passing in discussions about other aspects of his analysis, because it’s been on my mind a lot.

I can’t remember which post it was (please feel free to link me to it if you remember what I’m talking about), but someone mentioned that you almost have to watch the show in its historical context the way you would read a book written three centuries ago or something like that. Because social justice-y ways of watching the shows were not at all prominent ways of approaching these texts back then (15 years ago, more or less, which: crazy).

For instance. Read more... )

And I am sure I’m leaving out something I meant to say, so don’t be surprised if this post is edited to add stuff in the future. My mind does not at all work in a linear fashion, so I usually end up leaving things out.
lirazel: ([s] clever)
So Mark, he of the Mark Watches blog, is now watching Buffy straight through and posting his thoughts as he goes. This has stirred up a lot of feelings in the remnants of BtVS fandom, and we’ve already talked at length about the depth of his analysis (or, more accurately, the lack thereof) and whether or not we think it’s weird that he’s making money off of basically just posting his emotional responses to a show (for the record, my thoughts are: yes, it’s weird, but I’d probably do the same thing if I had the option, so I can’t really blame him). But I wanted to talk about something I’ve seen mentioned a couple of times in passing in discussions about other aspects of his analysis, because it’s been on my mind a lot.

I can’t remember which post it was (please feel free to link me to it if you remember what I’m talking about), but someone mentioned that you almost have to watch the show in its historical context the way you would read a book written three centuries ago or something like that. Because social justice-y ways of watching the shows were not at all prominent ways of approaching these texts back then (15 years ago, more or less, which: crazy).

For instance. Read more... )

And I am sure I’m leaving out something I meant to say, so don’t be surprised if this post is edited to add stuff in the future. My mind does not at all work in a linear fashion, so I usually end up leaving things out.
lirazel: ([s] clever)
So Mark, he of the Mark Watches blog, is now watching Buffy straight through and posting his thoughts as he goes. This has stirred up a lot of feelings in the remnants of BtVS fandom, and we’ve already talked at length about the depth of his analysis (or, more accurately, the lack thereof) and whether or not we think it’s weird that he’s making money off of basically just posting his emotional responses to a show (for the record, my thoughts are: yes, it’s weird, but I’d probably do the same thing if I had the option, so I can’t really blame him). But I wanted to talk about something I’ve seen mentioned a couple of times in passing in discussions about other aspects of his analysis, because it’s been on my mind a lot.

I can’t remember which post it was (please feel free to link me to it if you remember what I’m talking about), but someone mentioned that you almost have to watch the show in its historical context the way you would read a book written three centuries ago or something like that. Because social justice-y ways of watching the shows were not at all prominent ways of approaching these texts back then (15 years ago, more or less, which: crazy).

For instance. Read more... )

And I am sure I’m leaving out something I meant to say, so don’t be surprised if this post is edited to add stuff in the future. My mind does not at all work in a linear fashion, so I usually end up leaving things out.

so

Dec. 28th, 2011 08:53 am
lirazel: ([btvs] smackdown)
Someone on tumblr asked this question:

Which arcs, episodes, moments, etc. do you think are misunderstood in the Buffyverse?


and while I have about forty-five answers to that, I didn't voice them because it really just inspired one rant:

People thinking Buffy needs to get over being the Slayer and just be fine with it and stop complaining, WOMAN! So what that you’re bearing this unbelievable burden of protecting the entire world while still trying to have some sort of life (and raising your teenage sister despite the fact that you’re barely in your twenties) and that when it comes down to it you’re always going to be alone, the only one standing there staring down evil, and SO WHAT that you DIED MULTIPLE TIMES—literally giving your life for the world—AND YOU DON’T EVEN GET PAID OR THANKED FOR IT you’re just expected to do it and to take care of everyone around you all of the time (women’sworkwomen’sworkwomen’swork)? And so what that this setup is obviously designed and maintained by The Patriarchy (in the heavy-handed metaphor form of the Shadow Men + the Watcher’s Council) and that your constant kicking back against that could more generously be read as heroic and feminist, especially in the context of your obvious PTSD/clinical depression? SO WHAT? You just really need to get over that, shut up and quit complaining, go back to the kitchengraveyard, and just be grateful for your lot in life. Other ladies do it, why can’t you?

And then when you ultimately decide to tear down the entire patriarchal structure by rejecting the kyriarchically-enforced (is that a word? whatever) rule of a single woman standing alone and instead embracing the idea of women sharing power and saving the whole damn world together, you’ll be attacked for that, too. Even though you saved the lives of all the girls you shared that power with. Because you’ll never be good enough. Not ever.


Apparently I had a lot of feelings about this.

But seriously, the more I think about the show, the more obvious the metaphor of Slaying = women's work appears to me. Unpaid, unasked for, unappreciated. Done only by women. The concept that Buffy just needs to make peace with being the Slayer in her pre-"Chosen" world just kills me, because if she did that, she'd be buckling under and agreeing to live the life that The Patriarchy has forced on her even though she doesn't want it. How can that choice possibly be construed as feminist? To be, the feminism of her actions comes in fighting back. If she had ever accepted it totally, I think that would have been a betrayal of who she is as a person and also of the show's attempts at feminism, clumsy though they may be at times.

There are lots of reasons why the solution she comes up with in "Chosen" works for me. Not only is she saving all of the rest of the potential Slayers in the world from being ruthlessly slaughtered by the Harbingers, but she's also making a statement and dealing a blow to The Patriarchy. She's saying, "This isn't right. This power should be shared with other women. We should stand together. We don't have to be alone anymore." Because I think that if you pay attention to the show and specifically to Buffy's complaints about the Slayer, it's clear that it isn't the physical power that she hates--she learns just how much she appreciates it in "Helpless," and we see her relish it often. What weighs her down is the burden of being The Only One, The One Girl, She Alone. Standing by herself and staring down evil and knowing that she'll sacrifice her life as often as she's brought back to save the world and that she won't be paid or thanked for it. That she just has to do it, by herself, on top of everything else she has to do in life. That's what's so awful about being the Slayer, and that is precisely what she defeats in "Chosen." That doesn't meant that it's a perfect solution--we see the fact that potential problems accompany the benefits of this solution in Dana in "Damages," and that's important to remember. But I think that overall it's a beautiful if clumsy metaphor, and it totally works for me. I can't bring myself to hate anything that tells us that it's a powerful and beautiful thing when women share their power with each other.

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